How to Seed and Juice Pomegranates

…With­out mak­ing a giant mess. I real­ize there are super savvy peo­ple who have the seed­ing and juic­ing of pome­gran­ates all fig­ured out, but up until yes­ter­day I did not. I heard all about the super health ben­e­fits of pome­gran­ates, but get­ting into these things is impos­si­ble. I bought one pome­gran­ate a while ago, and after I was done pop­ping all the seeds it looked like a blood­bath. And they stain. Oh, do they ever…

How to Seed and Juice PomegranatesSo I did what every intel­li­gent per­son would: I went on YouTube. There, to my aston­ish­ment, was the solu­tion: bowl of water, halved pome­gran­ate, gen­tly pop the seeds, the seeds sink, the white stuff floats. Skim the white stuff with a small colander.

Now you know how to seed and juice Pome­gran­ates! Pome­gran­ates for everyone!

How to Seed and Juice Pomegranates

But I wasn’t done yet. Why not juice?? There’s our Oster ↓ It sounds like the space shut­tle is tak­ing off, but it was 60 bucks and does the job. I put in a batch of pome­gran­ate seeds, then poured off the purée into a medium fine-​mesh colan­der to sieve. I was extra zeal­ous to get every­thing through apart from the pits — and it made for nice, thick juice. It tasted noth­ing like juices from the store, it was sweet and tart, and very, very rich. It tasted like I was actu­ally drink­ing nutri­tion, and I can’t say the same thing about the juices I buy…

Reader tip — give the purée a go in a food proces­sor with a plas­tic blade, instead of in the blender. It won’t be as aggres­sive on the seeds, and will give the juice much bet­ter con­sis­tency. I tried it, and it worked beau­ti­fully!! Thanks, Steph!

How to Seed and Juice Pomegranates

Pome­gran­ates are very high in potas­sium and a good source of vit­a­min C and B5. They’re also chock full of antiox­i­dants, some of them unique to this fruit. Just as awe­some — they keep very well, up to 3 weeks at room tem­per­a­ture, and up to 3 months in the fridge (I couldn’t believe this).* So stock up!

How to Seed and Juice Pomegranates

* I just picked up a copy of 200 Super­Foods That Will Save Your Life, another rea­son I love sec­ond hand shop­ping. It’s a good book, by the way. A no-​diet approach to liv­ing — refresh­ing in our world of fads (don’t get me started) and mis-​information. It has a list of the 200 nutri­ent rich “super­foods” which have var­i­ous health ben­e­fits and orga­nizes them by type: car­bo­hy­drate, starchy carb, fibrous carb, fruit, oils, pro­teins, grains and herbal “free foods”. It also has recipes that are help­ful in giv­ing you ideas of how to add some of the foods you may be unfa­mil­iar with into your diet. And did you know that brown mush­rooms have more antiox­i­dants than white but­ton mush­rooms? Maybe you’d like to check it out?

Until next time :)

Comments

  1. You’ll want to try using a food proces­sor with a plas­tic blade next time, using a cheese­cloth or ded­i­cated pil­low case to squeeze out all the juice. The plas­tic blade isn’t as aggres­sive as the metal one, thus not break­ing up the seeds as much and reduc­ing the dry fla­vor in the final product.

  2. Gor­geous pho­tos, espe­cially the one with blue back­splash. I love pome­gran­ates! I grew up eat­ing them and when my mom peeled them it was a bloody mess. There was no YouTube back then.:) My hus­band watched the video recently and now he is the only one pro clean­ing pome­gran­ates in our house. Kids love them too! We just eat them plain.
    I have exactly the same blender and it sounds ter­ri­ble and splashes my green smoothie through the holes in the lid every­where. But it was $40 and what­ever.
    Inter­est­ing about brown mush­rooms. I love sec­ond hand book shop­ping or bet­ter library bor­row­ing.
    And I never buy juices. Very rarely as a treat for kids.

    • CanuckCuisine says:

      Maybe one day I’ll get the Vita­mix, I oggled it at Williams Sonoma, but I can’t bring myself to spend $700 on a blender. I’d rather buy plane tick­ets to some­where nice!
      I get most of my cook­books at Value Vil­lage, for like $4 each!

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